Archives November 2023

Folks fest's Block Heater to incorporate Inuk singer Tanya Tagaq, Daniel Romano's Outfit

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Polaris Prize-winning Inuk throat singer Tanya Tagaq will return to Calgary after a four-year touring hiatus as one of many performers at The Calgary Folks Music Competition’s Block Heater, which is able to run at numerous venues from Feb. 15 to 17.

Twenty-seven artists from eight nations are scheduled to play over three days on the Calgary Folks Music Competition’s February showcase. Different acts introduced embody Daniel Romano’s Outfit, Quebec’s Matt Holubowski, Portuguese-raised singer-songwriter Nico Paulo, Halifax alt-popster Wealthy Aucoin, July Speak’s Peter Desires, California Americana act The Satan Makes Three, American “roots orchestra” Dustbowl Revival, Dene siblings Sechile Sedare, Montreal soul singer Dominique Fils-Aime, Mali guitarist Vieux Farka Toure, France/U.Ok. outfit That is the Equipment, nation blues singer-songwriter Cat Clyde and Vancouver’s Empanadas Ilegales.

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Dominique Fils-Aime. Picture by Andreanne Gauthier. jpg

Locals Kue Varo & The Solely Hopes, hip-hop act KtheChosen and The Knomads, singer-songwriter Jolene Marie, Lethbridge’s Starpainter and roots collective The Mud Collectors are additionally scheduled to carry out. Live shows shall be held at Competition Corridor, Ironwood Stage & Grill, the Blues Can, The Palace Theatre, Central United Church, the #1 Legion and Olympic Plaza.

For a full schedule and tickets go to calgaryfolkfest.com.

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Getting older in place might deliver a boomer wave of residence gross sales within the coming years

Boomers, born between 1946 and 1964, are staying of their houses longer. Additionally they personal about 41 per cent of all houses in Canada.

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Calgary seniors are more and more reluctant sellers, however many could possibly be itemizing their houses within the coming years as the primary era of the newborn boomers reaches their late 80s, a brand new report forecasts.

“Our examine discovered the pattern towards shifting into rental, condominiums or different downsizing choices has not been as pronounced, particularly over the past decade,” says housing market analyst Taylor Pardy with Canada Mortgage and Housing Corp., which launched the brand new report.

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That is largely pushed by child boomers — born between 1946 and 1964 — selecting to stay of their present houses longer than previous generations.

“Based mostly on these projections, between 2030 and 2040 is after we would probably see probably the most listings coming to the market,” Pardy says, noting that offer might comprise quite a lot of single-family houses. The CMHC Housing Market Perception examine titled What can we learn about aged folks’s behaviour on the Canadian actual property market? got here to this conclusion after analyzing the sell-rate amongst seniors over the past three many years.

It discovered that, for people ages 75 and older nationally, the proportion of house owners promoting fell from about 42 per cent for the interval of 1991 to 1996 to about 36 per cent for the span between 2016 and 2021.

In Alberta, the sell-rate fell from about 40 per cent to 35 per cent. By comparability, Ontario’s sell-rate for the newest interval was 34 per cent down from 41 per cent.

“The sell-rate general as a proportion of these households has been falling, however the general variety of homes on the whole altering fingers has been growing in absolute quantity, which is only a operate of the inhabitants rising over time,” Pardy says.

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That’s unsurprising, he provides, given child boomers make up a good portion of homeownership in Canada — about 41 per cent of all houses, in line with Statistics Canada knowledge from 2021.

“However that first era of child boomers — born within the Nineteen Forties and early ’50s — might be reaching age 85 beginning at about 2030.” Pardy provides that’s when extra single-family houses might come onto the market because the sell-rate from the mid-80s and up rises steeply.

Because the CMHC examine discovered, the sell-rate for owners between ages 85 and 89 is about 55 per cent, rising to about 72 per cent for ages 90 to 94, after which reaching near 84 per cent between ages 95 and 99.

Pardy notes the anticipated final result might additionally result in demand development for residence condominiums, leases and different smaller housing sorts as extra octogenarian boomers downsize.

Already, Canadians aged 55 and upward usually tend to downsize than youthful owners to condominiums, rental flats or different smaller housing sorts, the examine discovered. In Calgary, the proportion change in households dwelling in a condominium rises from 4.4 per cent for people of their 50s to mid-60s to six.6 per cent for these ages 70 to 84.

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The examine additional reveals that the majority growing old Calgarians downsize to a condominium moderately than hire, the same pattern to Edmonton, Toronto and Vancouver, whereas seniors in Ottawa and Montreal present a higher desire to hire.

Though boomers might sooner or later present a major provide of single-family indifferent houses to the Calgary market, this final result is unlikely to emerge anytime quickly because of already low stock for all housing sorts, says native realtor Richard Fleming at Re/Max Mountain View.

“It’s the identical for seniors as different owners,” he says. “Most don’t need to promote as a result of they’ll’t discover the townhome, duplex or rental to maneuver to, and they also don’t promote.”

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Alberta most open to commerce between provinces and territories, rating suggests

However Montreal Financial Institute additionally finds Alberta ranks worst on the subject of labour mobility of expert professionals.

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Alberta continues to guide the pack on the subject of fostering commerce inside Canada, in accordance with an evaluation by the Montreal Financial Institute.

The assume tank, which has been monitoring limitations to interprovincial commerce for the reason that Canadian Free Commerce Settlement went into impact on July 1, 2017, discovered Alberta at the moment has solely six exceptions to the deal, down from greater than 25 earlier than the deal was signed.

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The identical evaluation, launched Thursday, discovered Quebec on the different finish of the spectrum, with 35 exceptions to the free commerce settlement — unchanged from 2017.

“It shouldn’t be more durable to move items between Calgary and Montreal than between Calgary and Medication Hat,” mentioned Krystle Wittevrongel, senior coverage analyst on the MEI and creator of the institute’s Inside Commerce Provincial Management Index. “Sadly, all of us pay the value for these limitations by paying extra for the products and providers we eat.”

Within the two years for the reason that MEI’s final analysis of interprovincial commerce, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Newfoundland and Labrador, and Yukon have all decreased the variety of exceptions to the nationwide commerce treaty, the examine discovered.

Alberta hasn’t made any adjustments lately however eliminated most limitations quickly after the free commerce settlement was instituted.

“The efforts of Alberta, to raise itself up from one of many worst to the entrance of the pack by way of interprovincial commerce, are commendable,” mentioned Wittevrongel in an announcement launched Thursday. “Different Canadian provinces ought to observe its instance and stroll the stroll by lowering these commerce limitations.”

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Alberta lagging on labour mobility, examine finds

The MEI was much less obsessed with Alberta’s stance on labour mobility, nonetheless, noting the province has the very best variety of skilled exceptions to mobility guidelines inside the Canadian Free Commerce Settlement.

The examine describes labour mobility as “the power of staff to maneuver freely between provinces and territories while not having vital further coaching, work expertise, examination, or evaluation.”

“Whereas Alberta has proven the way in which by lowering its exemptions to the sale of products and providers between provinces, it has some work to do by way of labour mobility,” mentioned Wittevrongel. “It’s ridiculous {that a} nurse skilled in Ontario, for instance, has to retrain earlier than treating a affected person in Alberta.”

On this measure, Nunavut leads the way in which with no exceptions, whereas Quebec finds itself in the course of the pack.

The examine notes Alberta’s limits to labour mobility coincide with a number of health-related sectors experiencing labour shortages, together with dental hygienists, licensed sensible nurses, medical radiation technologists, nurse practitioners, paramedics, and podiatrists.

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Earlier this 12 months, Alberta proclaimed a brand new labour mobility legislation launched in 2021 that offers Canadian professionals like medical doctors, a number of expert trades, and engineers extra certainty about how lengthy it would take to get their credentials authorised.

The Labour Mobility Act requires regulatory authorities for greater than 100 professions to take not more than 10 enterprise days to acknowledge receipt of an utility from somebody who’s already licensed elsewhere in Canada and desires to work in Alberta.

They then have 20 enterprise days to decide and one other 10 to let the individual know the outcome.

The brand new guidelines are a step in the appropriate course however extra must the achieved for different expert labourers, the institute mentioned.

“The scarcity of such professionals within the province has reached disaster ranges, particularly in rural areas,” mentioned the textual content of the MEI evaluation. “As well as, Canadians are shifting to Alberta in document numbers. To make the very best use of its assets, these occupational exceptions should be rectified.”

With recordsdata from Postmedia

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Glenbow exhibit shines a light-weight on treasure trove of Inuit textile artwork from Nunavut

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In 1957, a gaggle of Inuit artists acquired collectively in what’s now Kinngait, Nunavut, to earn extra cash

It was a interval of large social change within the space, significantly for the Inuit. They had been shifting into settlements, pressured to surrender searching and relying on store-bought meals for the primary time. Their conventional language and relationship to the land had been ceaselessly altered.

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So this initiative was meant to be a sensible train, a means for Inuit artists to provide work within the north that might be offered in different components of North America and Europe.

At first, it was a loose-knit group that met in an Inuit hamlet on Dorset Island, a group referred to as Cape Dorset till altering its title to Kinngait in 2020. However inside two years, the artists got here collectively formally because the West Baffin Cooperative. It’s a company that also exists right now in Kinngait as a studio, producing and selling new printmaking works by Inuit artists.

It was Canadian artist James Houston who launched printmaking to the Inuit group in ’57. Alongside paper printmaking, which might ultimately show fashionable and profitable, the artists additionally experimented with graphic textiles. For a decade, these artists produced a daring and vibrant physique of labor in material that remained largely undiscovered till lately.

By 1968, the cooperative shut down its fabric-printing efforts. Lots of the materials had been boxed, put in storage and all however forgotten.

In 2016, the cooperative invited Roxane Shaughnessy, lead curator of Toronto’s Textile Museum of Canada, to check out the work.

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Textiles displayed in a brand new exhibition Printed Textiles from Kinngait Studios within the Glenbow on the Edison gallery on Nov. 23, 2023. Gavin Younger/Postmedia Gavin Younger/Postmedia

“We had been blown away to see them,” she says. “It was only a exceptional expertise.”

Roughly 200 items had been ultimately shipped from the gathering to the Toronto museum. That ultimately led to the exhibition, Printed Textiles from Kinngait Studios, which is at present on show in Calgary on the Edison. The majority of the exhibit, which first opened in Toronto in 2019, is made up of work by 20 Inuit artists who labored within the early days of the cooperative. 

“We began doing the analysis and that concerned numerous session from individuals who have labored with Inuit artwork, but in addition we had been very decided that the voices of the Inuit group could be concerned within the course of,” Shaughnessy says. “We needed to speak to them and discover out extra about their relationship with these materials. That proved to be a big a part of the exhibition. I travelled as much as Kinngait a few occasions and introduced the photographs of the works and (attended) a few gatherings with group members and confirmed them the pictures and what we had found. That proved to be a extremely fascinating expertise as a result of a lot of them acknowledged their kin because the artists, who had been deceased, however they noticed their title attributed to a few of the materials.”

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The exhibition, which additionally showcases black and white pictures of a few of the textiles being created, options 40 items from the gathering and is supposed to behave as a bridge from the previous to the current of Inuit artwork, not just for these at present working within the collective however for the broader group. Together with the items from the Fifties and Sixties, there may also be work by present Inuit vogue designers Tarralik Duffy of Ugly Fish, Martha Kyak of InukChic and Nooks Lindell of Hinaani Design that present the legacy of those daring textiles.

Whereas the unique items had been created to capitalize on the artist-designed textiles that had been fashionable in North America and Europe on the time, the items preserve the aesthetics of Inuit artists.

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Textiles are displayed within the new exhibition Printed Textiles from Kinngait Studios within the Glenbow on the Edison gallery on Nov. 23, 2023.Gavin Younger/Postmedia Gavin Younger/Postmedia

“That’s one factor that’s actually wonderful about these items is that they incorporate a whole lot of Inuit tales, methods of life, animals, birds,” Shaughnessy says. “They’re vastly linked with the setting within the designs. There are some which are a little bit bit summary and I don’t know actually the place that inspiration got here from, however they largely actually replicate the life on the time and the significance of the tradition to them and the setting and the spirit world as effectively, and the way shut they had been to that.”

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Paper printmaking has remained central to the West Baffin Cooperative for almost 65 years, incomes it a worldwide status for longevity because the longest-running print studio in Canada and for its limited-edition prints.

However till lately, this material assortment had remained a little-known treasure trove. The items had been marketed and offered however largely fell off the radar throughout that 10-year interval.

“That may be a actually large a part of this undertaking, bringing that story again to the group . . . and making it accessible for those that are there now to see and turn into conscious of what was happening,”  Shaughnessy says. “However the place and significance of those textiles within the precise historical past of Inuit artwork has by no means actually been acknowledged. So this exhibition is trying to shine a light-weight on this wonderful work and hoping that extra visibility and consciousness of them will change that and make individuals extra conscious.”

Printed Textiles from Kinngait Studios will likely be on show at Glenbow on the Edison till March 3. 

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Textiles are displayed within the new exhibition Printed Textiles from Kinngait Studios within the Glenbow on the Edison. Gavin Younger/Postmedia Gavin Younger/Postmedia
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Textiles are displayed within the new exhibition Printed Textiles from Kinngait Studios within the Glenbow on the Edison gallery. Gavin Younger/Postmedia Gavin Younger/Postmedia
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Textiles are displayed within the new exhibition Printed Textiles from Kinngait Studios within the Glenbow on the Edison gallery. Gavin Younger/Postmedia Gavin Younger/Postmedia

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Assessment: Humorous but menacing, Vertigo's Sleuth principally excels

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As wickedly entertaining as it’s, Vertigo Theatre’s manufacturing of Sleuth just isn’t all it may very well be.

Written 53 years in the past, this comedian thriller is a devilishly intelligent cat-and-mouse recreation during which the roles of feline and rodent preserve switching as a result of it’s all about one-upmanship.

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The rich, urbane, and really British Andrew Wyke is a extremely profitable author of detective fiction. He has invited Milo Tindle, the son of an immigrant Italian watchmaker, to his Wilshire manor home to debate a three way partnership which Wyke insists will make them each a lot happier. Wyke is conscious that Tindle is his spouse Marguerite’s not-so-secret lover, and he needs Tindle to steal Marguerite’s well-insured jewellery. This fashion Tindle will manage to pay for to maintain Marguerite within the type to which she is accustomed. Wyke doesn’t need Marguerite to return operating again as soon as she has exhausted Tingle’s meagre funds.

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Wyke is the form of position that matches Christopher Hunt like a well-tailored swimsuit. He will get to be a pompous, smarmy, self-aggrandizing wordsmith. Hunt is ready to make him concurrently interesting and obnoxious, a feat that’s not as straightforward as he makes it appear. Within the first act, Wyke is clearly in management and he enjoys being a puppet grasp.

With nice talent, Braden Griffiths goes by a gamut of feelings as Tindle tries desperately to grasp Wyke’s motives. Wyke retains plying Tindle with costly liquor as he bombards him with insults, and but he appears to be providing Tindle an excessive amount of cash and permission to be the adulterer.

Initially, Wyke and Tindle might not be evenly matched, however Hunt and Griffiths are, and that’s what makes the primary act bristle with barbed humour. It’s such nice enjoyable watching the 2 actors spar so elegantly.

English playwright Anthony Shaffer understood the significance of theatrics or else all of the intelligent banter wouldn’t have been in a position to maintain a play in extra of two hours. His script has Wyke insisting that Tingle disguise himself, and the costumes he suggests are pleasant. When Tindle settles on a clown outfit, it permits Griffiths to take pleasure in some tough, and seemingly painful, pratfalls, particularly down the staircase. Watching Griffiths break into the upstairs window is hilarious, as is using some dynamite, however there may be at all times a way of menace in all the things Wyke suggests.

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Braden Griffiths in Vertigo Theatre’s Sleuth. Photograph by Tim Nguyen Co. /Tim Nguyen Co.

It’s the primary half of the second act the place issues disintegrate.

There are any variety of Calgary administrators who would have trusted Griffiths’ talents to hold off the grand deception that Shaffer devised, however Toronto-based director Cherissa Richards determined to let Helen Knight play Inspector Doppler, robbing Griffiths of what’s meant to be a head-shaking, star flip. Knight takes up the project with nice relish, mining all of the intelligent schtick Shaffer has written for the character, but it surely’s not what the playwright meant.

In the course of the second half of the second act, Hunt and Griffiths get to spar once more and vie for standing of their now edgier video games, and each actors are as soon as once more in advantageous type.

One other missed alternative comes with Andy Moro’s set. There isn’t any method Andrew Wyke, a person so firmly grounded previously, and in custom, can be residing in such a chilly, sterile, Formica retreat.

Richards’ staging ensures that Sleuth just isn’t some musty museum piece however a twisty and twisted, completely partaking thriller. It runs within the Vertigo Theatre on the base of the Calgary Tower till Dec. 17.

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Nelson: Metropolis administration leads council by the nostril

Today, what civic division heads need is what they invariably get

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Solely metropolis council would try to resolve an reasonably priced housing disaster by intentionally making housing costlier for Calgarians.

However that’s what it did final week in approving, by a 9-6 vote, an astonishing 7.8 per cent residential price hike — thereby rubber-stamping subsequent 12 months’s price range with barely a change from that originally served up by civic administration.

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Sure, lately, what civic division heads need is what they invariably get, even when what’s desired means jacking up charges on owners when inflation is making day by day residing a relentless wrestle.

Council appears to not understand it’s being led by its collective nostril by the people supposedly working for them. Or possibly it’s completely satisfied to play alongside, as a number of council members have been heartily endorsed by civic unions over the last election marketing campaign.

All civic administration must do is tick the correct containers by throwing in some flowery victimhood rhetoric — even higher if the phrase colonialism will be shoehorned in there by some means — after which stand again and smile, as a result of it’s pennies from heaven time but once more. (Chances are you’ll recollect it was administration that got here up with the daft thought of banning Canada Day fireworks final summer season, not council. Whereas that little nugget backfired, it did reveal how the sport of conserving the mayor and council candy is performed — no person ever asks a pointed query, particularly one together with that dreadful phrase “worth for cash.”)

Besides, with this newest budgetary horror present, it isn’t pennies we’re being requested to shell out, irrespective of the high-minded utterances emanating from councillors similar to Gian-Carlo Carra, who regaled us all by asserting his household will get such an awesome deal by solely paying $12.30 a day for metropolis companies.

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Let’s not less than give him credit score for originality. Normally, politicians making an attempt to justify the unjustifiable take refuge in that well-worn, cup-of-coffee analogy — how this insignificant enhance barely quantities to the price of your morning java. Maybe we must always retort that really it’s equal to the price of our baby’s dinner. That places issues in a slightly totally different mild, don’t you assume?

However maintain on. It appears we’re not really going to be paying extra to the town. We’re instructed by Ward 11’s Kourtney Penner that we’re investing.

Actually? So, we are able to anticipate not simply our a refund, but in addition some juicy dividends into the discount?

In fact not: it’s simply extra council bafflegab, hiding behind the English language to camouflage the plain reality — that this lot is as fiscally irresponsible as any council in Calgary’s historical past.

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So what are we getting with these 28 new funding priorities the town will spend our cash on?

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Its precedence is making housing extra reasonably priced. Sure, imposing a price enhance of virtually eight per cent for owners is the surefire technique to make this occur. The thoughts does boggle at such logic. Like a set of modern-day Robin Hoods, they are going to take from the wealthy — those that have a home — to provide to the poor — those that don’t.

Calgarians will shell out $90 million for housing-related funding within the subsequent three years, a hefty a part of this to “help companions to construct housing for Indigenous and equity-deserving populations.”

However what precisely are “equity-deserving populations?” Individuals who can’t afford a house? Individuals who sleep on the streets? Individuals simply launched from jail? Youngsters who can’t stand residing with mother and pa a second longer and wish a spot of their very own?

A council that wasn’t as completely owned by administration may ask these simple questions. This lot received’t. Heaven assist them, somebody may then name them racist, sexist or — worst of all — colonialist.

See how this shell sport works? It’s nothing to do with serving to folks however all to do with ensuring the bucks preserve rolling into metropolis corridor. If you are able to do that whereas showing morally superior, then that’s additional gravy for you.

Chris Nelson is a daily Herald columnist.

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Opinion: Because the world heads to COP, how can Canada and the U.Okay. work collectively?

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King Charles III gave a powerful name for motion at his opening handle to the United Nations local weather convention in Dubai, generally known as COP28.

At a time when the window to attain international local weather commitments continues to slender, robust illustration and sustaining excessive ambition issues extra now than ever. A considerable delegation of U.Okay. ministers and enterprise leaders have taken this spirit to Dubai, led by Prime Minister Rishi Sunak. This may reveal the UK’s persevering with dedication to tackling local weather change as probably the most urgent international precedence.

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Alberta has additionally despatched its personal substantial delegation.

The setting for this yr’s convention is hard. Globally, we proceed to see important challenges round the price of residing, together with each within the U.Okay. and Canada. In our international locations, this has generated full of life debate on how greatest to method delivering our local weather commitments. Recognizing this problem within the U.Okay., Sunak lately outlined some tweaks in insurance policies on how net-zero commitments shall be met. Nonetheless, he didn’t cut back on the legally binding dedication for the U.Okay. to succeed in net-zero by 2050, nor its carbon discount targets for 2030 or 2035, that are simply as essential if we wish to attain the 2050 objective.

The U.Okay.’s success in decarbonizing sooner than every other main financial system — with emissions diminished by greater than 48 per cent between 1990 and 2021 — permits the U.Okay. some house to take inventory and, the place wanted, make pragmatic changes to insurance policies that will disproportionately have an effect on these going through probably the most important monetary pressures — akin to offering further time to make electrical car purchases and to decarbonize residence heating by the adoption of warmth pumps and boilers which can be extra environment friendly.

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Very similar to in Canada, decarbonizing our power sector continues to be a problem however can also be a significant pillar of the U.Okay.’s net-zero transition. We, too, have a objective for the sector to be net-zero by 2035. The U.Okay. has established its place as a worldwide chief in wind energy. It’s residence to the 4 largest offshore wind farms on this planet and, with a good bigger one in improvement, we’re on observe to generate as much as 50 gigawatts in offshore wind power by 2030 — about one-quarter of our future power wants. Our progress in renewables is complemented by giant investments in our low-carbon power combine that may embody the deployment of small modular nuclear reactors ($362 million), carbon seize clusters ($35 billion) and improved electrical grid connectivity.

Why does this matter to Canada? Canada and the U.Okay. have most of the identical decarbonization objectives, pushed by worldwide commitments. We share most of the technical, social and political challenges surrounding net-zero insurance policies and the drive for expertise improvement as a key enabler for decarbonization. These joint challenges have led to deep collaboration in areas akin to hydrogen, low-emission transportation, the phaseout of coal from energy era and lots of joint analysis and improvement tasks in clear expertise. Our companies already share substantial expertise and experience — the settlement between B.C.’s Svante Applied sciences and the U.Okay.’s carbon seize firm Storegga to ship built-in tasks world wide is an efficient current instance.

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Nonetheless, we are able to do extra to study from one another to succeed in net-zero and assist guarantee we keep on observe to restrict international warming to a most of 1.5 levels — together with by the trade of regulatory and workforce coaching approaches wanted to know the financial alternatives from decarbonization, to how we handle our energy grids and greatest make the most of carbon seize.

At COP28, amid the flurry of negotiations, bulletins and new commitments, our ministers and officers shall be working to advance these alternatives so we are able to ship actual motion and management in how we meet our net-zero commitments.

Jonathan Turner is the British Consul Normal in Calgary.

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Parker: B.C.-based OK Frozen Dough increasing to southern Alberta

OK Frozen Dough is a family-owned enterprise that has been supplying high quality frozen-dough merchandise to western Canadian impartial bakers, eating places, meals companies and main grocery retailers since 1994

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That tasty crusty bun you get pleasure from at this time was in all probability constructed from frozen dough shipped from Armstrong, B.C., however the firm is increasing its operations into Calgary, that means we will boast one other native product.

OK Frozen Dough (OKFD) is a family-owned enterprise that has been supplying high quality frozen-dough merchandise to western Canadian impartial bakers, eating places, meals companies and main grocery retailers since 1994. It has grown to grow to be a trusted provider of greater than 100 merchandise made with premium components, and the demand means the corporate has to extend manufacturing capability.

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The 30,000-square-foot plant in Armstrong was constructed 30 years in the past and the devoted group of fifty staff who work there proceed to serve OKFD effectively. However CEO Bruce Glaicar says progress of market share from Vancouver Island to Manitoba meant he wanted a brand new manufacturing facility.

After scuffling with transportation issues getting product to Alberta and Manitoba on the opposite facet of the Rockies — hampered by building delays and diversions on the Trans-Canada Freeway east of Golden, B.C. — Calgary was a straightforward alternative.

It’s additionally the place the grain comes from.

Glaicar has accomplished the acquisition of a constructing alongside Wagon Wheel Manner within the industrial space of Balzac.

The primary quarter of 2024 will see the opening of a 36,000-square-foot plant when renovations are accomplished and OKFD’s new tools is put in, which can allow it to grow to be an SQF-certified facility validating the corporate’s stringent meals security program. It can embody mixers and forming tools, and spiral and blast freezers to quick-freeze the merchandise.

At opening the ability could have educated a employees depend of round 15, however that determine will develop — abiding by the corporate motto of “Present up, and take a look at onerous.”

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OKFD was based by companions Philip Thornton and Kevin Fors. Over time, tools was added, product growth occurred and manufacturing procedures had been fine-tuned. It solidified its popularity within the Okanagan, Inside and Kootenay areas of B.C., and with the rising reputation of frozen dough, in-store bakeries had been switching from scratch to frozen and its shopper base was expanded to serve grocery retailers throughout Western Canada.

Below the management of Glaicar, who assumed the position of CEO in 2016, the corporate has seen vital progress whereas sustaining its constant high quality and 100 per cent fill charges for patrons.

Commenting on the growth, Glaicar says: “Whereas our roots and dedication to the Okanagan/Spallumcheen will at all times stay robust, this marks a brand new chapter for OKFD that can enable us to proceed our dedication to assembly the rising wants of our clients throughout the prairies.”

The corporate’s growth right here with the acquisition of a constructing and trucking yard in Balzac is an thrilling resolution, one that can improve its capacity to help continued progress, and permit it to increase its bun and bread choices sooner or later.

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And it’s good for this space with the creation of latest jobs.

Notes:

Inbuilt 1911, the No. 1 Hearth Corridor is among the many most admired historic buildings within the metropolis. Though dwarfed at this time within the shadow of The Bow, it nonetheless stands as a fantastic instance of Edwardian brick and sandstone structure, boasting its 5 arched doorways. It served its goal as the house of the downtown hearth brigade till 1973 and has been vacant since September 2019, when 30-year tenant Price range Hire A Automotive selected to not renew its lease. Situated on an angle on the nook of 6th Avenue and 1st Steet S.E., the constructing was best for hearth vehicles speeding out in all instructions.

Owned by town, it has launched a brand new expression of curiosity to reimagine each the hearth corridor and its neighbour, the North-West Travellers Constructing — in-built 1912 as an workplace and membership for the North-West Travellers’ Affiliation of Canada.

They’ve been marketed earlier than with few responses, however now they’re being launched as a attainable venue the place arts and tradition organizations, partnering with personal enterprise, may create an area the place visible and performing arts teams are supported by way of reasonably priced lease house and live-in artist studios.

Responses to the expression of curiosity shut on Jan. 12.

David Parker seems recurrently within the Herald. Learn his columns on-line at calgaryherald.com/enterprise. He may be reached at 403-830-4622 or by e-mail at [email protected].

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Braid: Liberals are in disaster due to huge hole between their insurance policies and actual life

This Liberal fiasco is countrywide. The regional favouritism, government-imposed prices and unconstitutional legal guidelines are lastly past tolerance

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The Trudeau authorities is flip-flopping like a hooked flounder because it tries to flee the online of its personal contradictions.

Years of favouring one group over one other now proves disastrous for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, and particularly his Setting Minister, Steven Guilbeault.

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An Abacus ballot this week confirmed the Liberals 15 factors behind the Conservatives, and barely forward of the NDP.

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The Conservatives even lead by three factors in downtown Toronto. Just a few years in the past, the very thought would draw hoots of Liberal laughter.

In 28 GTA ridings outdoors the town itself, the Conservatives are forward by 13 factors.

Revered ballot aggregator 338Canada says the Conservatives have a 99-per-cent probability of successful essentially the most seats in an election.

It tasks 208 ridings for Pierre Poilievre’s get together, a 38-seat majority.

This Liberal fiasco is countrywide. The regional favouritism, government-imposed prices and unconstitutional legal guidelines are lastly past tolerance.

Everyone who’s upset has their very own purpose. Right here’s the case of Brian Allison, a farmer and rancher for 40 years in central Alberta.

He says the carbon tax on his farm operations is manageable now. “However once they get to 2030 and so they’re charging 170 bucks a tonne, it’s gonna change into a really, very, very massive drawback.”

Allison noticed Wednesday’s information that Dow Chemical will construct an $8.9-billion ethylene plant in Fort Saskatchewan, with full backing from Ottawa and the province.

The power will use pure fuel for feedstock.

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“It’s offensive that the federal government is on one hand penalizing me for utilizing pure fuel, and however rewarding business. Is that offensive from a farmer standpoint? Actually.

“I’ve little question that it’s good for our petrochemical business that they’re constructing this plant, and I believe that’s good for Alberta taxpayers.

“However why can’t the federal government be honest to all business? Why are they all the time choosing winners and losers? I believe that’s ridiculous.”

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Allison follows with nice curiosity a Senate debate over Conservative private-member’s Invoice C-234, which handed the Home of Commons final 12 months.

It might exempt farmers from paying carbon tax on pure fuel and propane used for grain drying and different farm heating and cooling.

The Senate has heard that many farmers don’t have any sensible technique to swap from these fuels to electrical energy. And the rising carbon tax makes operations much less viable over time.

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The invoice bought by means of the Home with out a lot objection. However now it wants Senate approval.

Proper in the course of this, the Liberals abruptly exempted residence heating oil from the carbon tax.

Liberal MLA Gudie Hutchings stated Atlantic Canada bought this prize as a result of Liberal MPs and ministers pressured the prime minister.

Cries of concern sounded throughout the nation. Oh, so it’s political in spite of everything? Why not exempt all residence heating gasoline? Why tax farm use of pure fuel?

Hutchings’ dangerously sincere partisanship threatened your complete tax regime. Trudeau and Guilbeault instantly stated there shall be no extra “carve-outs” from the carbon tax.

But when Invoice C-234 passes, the farm sector shall be exempted by regulation. The federal government can have no selection.

Because of this, there was monumental stress from the federal government for senators to vote towards the invoice.

Alberta farmer Brian Allison
Brian Allison farms 1,800 acres close to Delburne, east of Pink Deer, Alberta. Photograph courtesy Tyler Allison

For a sensible particular person like Brian Allison, who’s simply making an attempt to maintain his farm working, the political battle is exasperating but in addition crucial.

He factors out that one gigajoule of pure fuel places out 947,817 BTUs of vitality.

His price is $8.90 (together with $3.33 in carbon tax).

Deriving the identical vitality from electrical energy, he says, would price him $55.56.

“Electrical energy is over six occasions as costly as pure fuel for a similar warmth vitality.”

The Dow Chemical plant will produce net-zero emissions by means of carbon sequestration and different measures, largely with authorities assist.

Down on the farm, people don’t get to barter phrases. They simply get to pay.

Sometime, so will this authorities.

Don Braid’s column seems commonly within the Herald

X: @DonBraid

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Canmore housing costs buck pattern, common $1.7M for indifferent residence

Canmore is one in every of few ski cities in Canada that noticed vital bumps in housing costs as rates of interest start to weigh on customers

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Whereas most mountain cities in Canada are seeing small — and typically sharp — decreases in common residence costs, housing costs in Canmore are persevering with to surge.

Even after one of many worst wildfire seasons on report, the median worth of single-detached houses within the mountain city elevated 9.6 per cent within the first 10 months of 2023, hitting simply over $1.7 million.

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Canmore is one in every of few ski cities in Canada that noticed vital bumps in housing costs as rates of interest start to weigh on customers.

Wildfires over the summer season “prompted market disruptions” within the leisure property market, stated Pauline Aunger, dealer of report for Royal LePage Benefit Actual Property.

In Revelstoke, B.C., for instance, the median worth of a single-detached residence decreased a modest 1.1 per cent to $816,000, whereas costs in Solar Peaks outdoors Kamloops, B.C., dropped 21.3 per cent to about $1.2 million.

Costs for single-family indifferent models in Whistler — the place the common residence goes for a steep $3.6 million — in the meantime dropped simply 0.4 per cent, although Royal LePage expects that quantity to extend 5 per cent over the following 12 months.

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‘I don’t anticipate we are going to see a variety of new product hitting the market’: Canmore dealer

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Whereas Canmore’s rising home costs could seem vital, they pale compared to 2020, when the median worth for a single-detached residence elevated by 30 per cent 12 months over 12 months, cracking $1 million after averaging $793,750 a 12 months earlier.

Stock ranges in Canmore in the meantime stay 30 per cent beneath the 10-year common, maintaining market situations in favour of sellers.

Increased rates of interest haven’t dissuaded patrons within the city, as most transactions are made with out financing, stated Brad Hawker, a Canmore-based affiliate dealer with Royal LePage Options.

“I count on shopping for and promoting exercise will stay establishment for the foreseeable future, as purchasers with the posh of time look ahead to the precise leisure residence to return alongside,” Hawker stated.

Whole gross sales are in the meantime reverting again to pre-Covid ranges, the info present, down 17.2 per cent 12 months over 12 months.

mount nelson
A view of Mount Nelson from the summit of Panorama Mountain Resort. The self-contained village is situated on the sting of the Canadian Rockies, 18 km west of Invermere, B.C. Picture by Al Charest /Al Charest/Postmedia

Gross sales drop practically 25 per cent in Invermere, hit with a number of evacuation alerts in August

Invermere, B.C. has thus far fallen consistent with nationwide tendencies, seeing a modest 1.1 per cent enhance to single-family indifferent houses within the leisure property market, whereas apartment costs rose 1.3 per cent.

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The present 5 per cent key rate of interest have introduced extra houses on-line, Royal LePage stated, as whole gross sales have dropped 23 per cent 12 months over 12 months.

About three hours from Calgary, Invermere is a well-liked mountain city for southern Albertans in search of leisure property.

The inside B.C. neighborhood spent vital elements of the summer season cloaked in smoke and greater than 1,000 properties within the area confronted a number of evacuation alerts all through the summer season attributable to close by wildfires.

The Horsethief Creek wildfire, 10 kilometres west of Invermere and 7 kilometres north of Panorama Mountain Resort, introduced smoke out and in of the dry inside city for almost all of August. No houses or elements of the city have been broken by the hearth.

Demand has remained constant all year long regardless of the wildfires, stated Barry Benson, dealer at Royal LePage Rockies West Realty.

However purchasers have discovered it troublesome to promote their properties because of the wildfires, Benson stated, as smoke got here from practically all angles this summer season.

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